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Indigenizing
the (Art) Museum

SPRING 2021

ABOUT

Indigenizing the (Art) Museum launches Spring 2021 and is hosted in collaboration with Onsite Gallery as part of the Virtual Platform for Indigenous Art. Through a series of virtual In-Conversation events, Gerald McMaster will be joined each week by a different curator from (art) museums across Canada and the United States. Building upon 4 Roundtable discussions that took place in Summer 2020, the curators behind the collections and archives will examine the shifting dialogue around Indigenous art while reflecting on their own curatorial expertise and practices.

The Indigenizing the (Art) Museum series is hosted with Indigenous protocols in mind with the aim of addressing questions around Indigenous curation, ceremony, and research in digital spaces.

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Caption: Square bag with short rectangular flap decorated on one side with quillwork in a geometric design with human figures and edged with metal tubes (detail), Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford, Photograph by Dr. Gerald McMaster.

SERIES GUEST SCHEDULE

Each week this Spring, Gerald McMaster is joined by a different curator from institutions and (art) museums around the world.

APRIL 1
2021
Jill Ahlberg Yohe

Associate curator of Native American Art at
the Minneapolis Institute of Art

APRIL 15
2021
Annika Johnson

Associate Curator of Native American Art at
the Joslyn Art Museum

APRIL 22
2021
Greg Hill

Senior Curator of Indigenous Art at
the National Gallery of Canada

April 29
2021
Jaimie Isaac & Jocelyn Piirainen

Curator of Indigenous and Contemporary Art & Assistant Curator of Inuit Art at the Winnipeg Art Gallery

MAY 6
2021
Patricia Marroquin Norby

Associate Curator of Native American Art at 
the Metropolitan Museum of Art

MAY 13
2018
Kathleen Ash-Milby

Curator of Native American Art at
the Portland Art Museum

MAY 20
2021
John G. Hampton

Executive Director and CEO at
the MacKenzie Art Gallery

June 3
2021
Rhéanne Chartrand

Curator of Indigenous Art at

the McMaster Museum of Art 

JUNE 10
2021
Tarah Hogue

Inaugural Curator of Indigenous Art at
the Remai Modern

GUEST SPEAKERS & CURATORS

Below are the curators you will be meeting. Select a profile to learn more about their practice.

Jill Ahlberg Yohe

Position: Speaker

Jill Ahlberg Yohe is the associate curator of Native American Art at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia). In 2008, Ahlberg Yohe received her PhD from the University of New Mexico; her dissertation was a focus on the social life of weaving in contemporary Navajo life. Along with Teri Greeves, Ahlberg Yohe is the co-curator of “Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists.” At Mia, Ahlberg Yohe seeks new initiatives to expand understanding and new curatorial practices of historical and contemporary Native art.

Jill Ahlberg Yohe

Speaker

Jill Ahlberg Yohe is the associate curator of Native American...

Annika Johnson

Position: Speaker

Annika K. Johnson is associate curator of Native American Art at Joslyn Art Museum (Omaha, NE). Community engagement is central to her curatorial and research practices, which focus on Native American art in the Upper Plains from the 19th century to the present. She received her doctorate in art history at the University of Pittsburgh in 2019 with the support of Smithsonian American Art Museum and Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts fellowships. Her recent article on cross-cultural artmaking in Mni Sota Makoce can be found in Archives of American Art Journal.

Annika Johnson

Speaker

Annika K. Johnson is associate curator of Native American Art...

Greg Hill

Position: Speaker

Greg Hill is the first Indigenous curator at the National Gallery of Canada. He is currently the Audain Senior Curator of Indigenous Art, and he has been dedicated to increasing both the collection and display of Indigenous art at the National Gallery of Canada. An artist himself, Greg Hill has been exhibiting his work publicly since 1989 with more than 75 exhibitions to date. Exploring aspects of colonialism, nationalism, and concepts of place and community through the lens of his Kanyen’kehaka ancestry, his work can be found in public and private collections around the world. 

 

Image courtesy of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

Greg Hill

Speaker

Greg Hill is the first Indigenous curator at the National Gallery...

Patricia Marroquin Norby

Position: Speaker

Patricia Marroquin Norby (Purépecha) is the Associate Curator of Native American Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. She holds a PhD in American Studies from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, with a specialization in Native American art history and visual culture, as well as a MFA in printmaking and photography from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Norby also brings extensive teaching experience to The Met, including a position as Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, where she taught historical and contemporary Native American art history and culture at graduate and undergraduate levels.

 

Photo by Scott Rosenthal, courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Patricia Marroquin Norby

Speaker

Patricia Marroquin Norby (Purépecha) is the Associate Curator of Native American Art...

Kathleen Ash-Milby

Position: Speaker

Kathleen Ash-Milby is curator of Native American art at the Portland Art Museum. Previously as associate curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in New York she organized numerous exhibitions including Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound, with David Garneau. Ash-Milby was the curator and co-director of the American Indian Community House Gallery in New York City and has published widely on contemporary Native American art, including essays in Art in AmericaArt Journal, and contributed to and edited numerous exhibition catalogues. A member of the Navajo Nation, she earned her Master of Arts from the University of New Mexico. 

Kathleen Ash-Milby

Speaker

Kathleen Ash-Milby is curator of Native American art at the...

John G. Hampton

Position: Speaker

John G. Hampton (they/them or he/him) is a curator, artist, and administrator who joined the MacKenzie team as Director of Programs in October 2018. He holds a Masters of Visual Studies – Curatorial Studies from the University of Toronto, and a BA in Visual Arts from the University of Regina. John is a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation, the United States, and Canada, and grew up in Regina. He has previously held positions as Executive Director of the Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba, Artistic Director of Trinity Square Video, and Curator at Neutral Ground Artist Run Centre. In addition to his role at the MacKenzie Art Gallery, Hampton holds an adjunct curator appointment at the Art Museum at the University of Toronto, adjunct professorship at the University of Regina, and is the co-chair of the Indigenous Curatorial Collective board of directors.

 

Photo by Don Hall, courtesy of the MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina

John G. Hampton

Speaker

John G. Hampton (they/them or he/him) is a curator, artist, and...

Tarah Hogue

Position: Speaker

Tarah Hogue is a curator, writer and cultural worker based in Saskatoon, Treaty 6 territory and the homeland of the Métis. Her work is invested in the capacity of art and artists to envision and enact otherwise ways of being in the world, while seeking to unsettle settler colonial frameworks by prioritizing Indigenous knowledges in dialogue with other cultural communities. Hogue is Curator (Indigenous Art) and Remai Modern and is co-chair of the Indigenous Curatorial Collective / Collectif des commissaires autochtones. She is a citizen of the Métis Nation of Alberta. 

Tarah Hogue

Speaker

Tarah Hogue is a curator, writer and cultural worker based...

Rhéanne Chartrand

Position: Speaker

Rhéanne Chartrand (MMSt, Hons. BA) is a Métis curator and creative producer based in Toronto, Ontario. She has spent the past six years creating interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary exhibitions, showcases, and festivals for organizations such as Harbourfront Centre, OCAD University, the Art Gallery of Mississauga, the Indigenous Performing Arts Alliance, the Aboriginal Pavilion at the Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games, Kaha:wi Dance Theatre, and the National Museum of the American Indian (Washington, DC). Currently, Chartrand serves as the Curator of Indigenous Art at McMaster Museum of Art located in Hamilton, Ontario.

Rhéanne Chartrand

Speaker

Rhéanne Chartrand (MMSt, Hons. BA) is a Métis curator and...

WAPATAH & TEAM CONTRIBUTORS

Dr. Gerald McMaster

Position: Director, Tier 1 Canada Research Chair
Email: gmcmaster@faculty.ocadu.ca

Dr. McMaster has over 30 years international work and expertise in contemporary art, critical theory, museology and Indigenous aesthetics. His experience as an artist and curator in art and ethnology museums researching and collecting art, as well as producing exhibitions has given him a thorough understanding of transnational Indigenous visual culture and curatorial practice. His early interests concerned the ways in which culturally sensitive objects were displayed in ethnology museums, as well as the lack of representation of Indigenous artists in art museums.

As a practicing artist, he offered a way of staging hitherto decontextualized objects different from the traditional formats favoured by exhibition designers trained in Western traditions; instead, his was an approach that rested on Indigenous epistemologies. These early stages in developing an –Indigenous visuality led him to study concepts in visual, experiential and spatial composition. His exhibition Savage Graces (1992) challenged long held views, and played a major role in breaking down conventional barriers around where art should be practiced, while also demonstrating that art is not tied to ethnicity.

As a curator, he focused on advancing the intellectual landscape for Indigenous curatorship through the foundational concept of voice. He curated, for example, an exhibition called Indigena (1992) that brought together unfiltered Indigenous voices for the first time. Until then, non-Indigenous scholars had dominated discussions of Indigenous art, history and culture. McMaster made the point that Indigenous artists and writers were more than capable of representing themselves in articulate, eloquent ways.

Over the past 20 years, he has continued to refine the idea of voice, leading him to ask: How can Indigenous voices continue providing new perspectives on well-researched subjects such as art, history and anthropology? Throughout his career, his championing of the mainstream value of Indigenous art, among other things, has led to his being chosen to represent Canada at a number of prestigious international events. These include his serving as Canadian Commissioner for the 1995 Venice Biennale, and as artistic director of the 2012 Biennale of Sydney, and curator for the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale. 

Dr. Gerald McMaster

Director, Tier 1 Canada Research Chair

Dr. McMaster has over 30 years international work and expertise...

Natalja Chestopalova

Position: Research Project Coordinator

Natalja Chestopalova is part of the Ph.D. in Communication and Culture Program at York and Ryerson Universities in Toronto. Her research is informed by the study of digital media, archival aesthetics, phenomenology, and psychoanalysis, and focuses on the transformative sensory experience and multimodality in film, graphic novel medium, and theatrical site-specific performances. With the support from the Social Science and Humanities Council of Canada (SSHRC), she has presented at multiple Canadian and International events, including roundtables & panels on new media archives, visual storytelling, and preservation of ephemeral cultural narratives. Her recent works include papers and multimodal installations on archives-of-trauma in non-fiction graphic narratives and theoretical developments in the Lacanian concept of the voice and voicelessness. Her publications appear in the White Wall Review, Canadian Journal of Communication, Dialogue, The Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism, Sound Effects: The Object Voice in Fiction, and an essay volume on the Freudian theory of afterwardness and archives-of-feeling in comics of Alison Bechdel.
Currently Natalja is working as a researcher at the Ontario College of Art and Design University with Gerald McMaster. As part of the Indigenous Visual Culture Research Centre she is contributing to projects that actively support Indigenous talent, and promote meaningful research exchange, and contribute to the creation of living digital archives that can mobilize and centralize Indigenous knowledge.

Natalja Chestopalova

Research Project Coordinator

Natalja Chestopalova is part of the Ph.D. in Communication and...

Brittany Bergin

Position: Research Assistant

Brittany Bergin is an undergraduate student studying Aerospace Engineering. She is a research assistant at the Wapatah Centre and a researcher with York University’s Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage (MICH) program. Brittany’s maternal lineage is from Cape Dorset, related to the Ashoona family line. Raised in Ottawa, She is interested in engaging with Inuit art and culture as a way to connect with her heritage and family. Brittany’s work is inspired to bridge Inuit technologies with her aerospace research.

Brittany Bergin

Research Assistant

Brittany Bergin is an undergraduate student studying Aerospace Engineering. She...

Mariah Meawasige

Position: Research Assistant

Mariah (Makoose) is an Anishinaabe/settler and creative from the northern shores of Lake Huron. Her practice specializes in graphic design but questions the bounds of communication through illustration, sculpture, video, and performance. She created the logo for the Wapatah Centre for Indigenous Visual Knowledge and is currently working on the centre’s visual identity. Through her love of stories and storytelling, Mariah’s body of work aims to explore temporalities and place, map memories, and build relationships.

Mariah Meawasige

Research Assistant

Mariah (Makoose) is an Anishinaabe/settler and creative from the northern...

EVENT FAQS

This event will be hosted through Zoom and live-streamed on Youtube. Register through Eventbrite to receive links for viewing. More information on recording and photography will be announced soon.

Indigenizing the (Art) Museum is hosted in English with OCAD University A/V Support. If you are in need of closed captioning, please contact Brittany Pitseolak Bergin bbergin@faculty.ocadu.ca ahead of the event you are attending so that we can do our best to accommodate your needs.

Tickets registered through Eventbrite are valid only for a single event. If you are attending multiple events, you must register for each event separately through Eventbrite. Registration to attend through Zoom is limited. Registering for a single event will reserve one spot in the Zoom webinar. 

Each event will follow a similar structure supported through Zoom Webinar and YouTube livestream, moderated by the Indigenizing the Museum Team with OCADU A/V Support.

Open Dialogue with Gerald McMaster

 Q&A period through chat and/or Q&A box

 Access to recordings through wapatah.com

 
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